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Homeschool and tutoring kids

Homeschooling / How to Homeschool Nanny Kids

Homeschool and tutoring kids

Many career nannies know that the time between drop off and pick up at school is sacred. The school hours are where nannies can do laundry, schedule appointments, sanitize toys, and gear up for an afternoon of homework help. We’ve seen how the recent change in the childcare industry has affected nannies with parents working from home, but homeschooling has had just as significant an impact. How can nannies navigating in this new zoom school territory succeed?

Here are some tips:

Brush up on your educator skills

Nannying while kids are homeschooling means that you will inevitably become teacher yourself. Remain patient, ask leading questions, and always help them come to their conclusions and assignments on their own. Doing tasks for them is not going to do anyone any favors. If they don’t respond to a certain explanation, try and show them another way that they will understand. The beauty of being a nanny and a teacher is that you know the kids and their interests much better than a teacher would be able to. Spark their creativity by using dinosaurs as metaphors for counting if they’re into paleontology right now. Let them practice letters by writing their favorite words. If you don’t know how to answer a certain question, there is a wonderful new invention called Google. Of course, be sly about when you look things up, kids learn by example and we can’t have them copping out via the convenience of search engines.

“We are in uncharted territory, and all of these big changes can be really difficult for children to digest. When it gets hard, remember that your focus is on being a caregiver. The child’s grades are not a reflection of you or your nannying abilities, so remain compassionate and patient, as confidence and care are the main foundations for a child’s academic success ”

Create a classroom environment

A similar issue with nannies working around work from home parents is spacial boundaries. Kids are used to having their entire homes be just that – their home. But now their sacred-kid-space has been turned into office, home and school all in one and this can become stressful and confusing for developing minds. Designate a specific classroom area where kids will do their learning. Kids need structure and boundaries in order to thrive, and knowing that the dining room or a specific section of the living room is now their “school section” of the home will help them focus their energy to that specific task. Spruce up the area maybe with posters or familiar classroom objects to help them feel more at ease. Take breaks and eat snacks away from the classroom area to better help them adjust and concentrate while they are working.

Remain compassionate

We are in uncharted territory, and all of these big changes can be really difficult for children to digest. When it gets hard, remember that your focus is on being a caregiver. The child’s grades are not a reflection of you or your nannying abilities, so remain compassionate and patient, as confidence and care are the main foundations for a child’s academic success. It is also imperative that you have patience and compassion for yourself. You are a nanny and not necessarily an educator, so it may take some time for you to get into the swing of things. Remember your first day as a nanny, and how far you’ve come since then. Your educator skills will grow exponentially as well, which is a great thing to have on your nanny resume for future opportunities.
 
Nannying has always been fraught with rewarding challenges. If you are a nanny currently providing care to homeschooling children, we’d love to hear your stories of success and struggle alike. As always, reach out to us with any questions or concerns.
eas and tips on how to make every day equally fun and educational. There are a ton of awesome nanny blogs for creative solutions, as well as nannying groups you can join on social media.

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Nanny Interview Tips

5 Nanny Interview Questions that should not be skipped

Nanny Interview Tips

Searching for the right nanny for your family can be a daunting task, especially if it’s your first time finding someone to entrust your child’s safety to. How do I find the right nanny? How do I know if a nanny is the right fit? What questions should I ask a nanny in the interview? If you’re a first time nanny-hunter (or even a nanny looking for a job and a way to brush up on your interview skills), these childcare interview questions can help you find the perfect fit for your family (or your next job). If you have additional questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to us! If you sign up for our newsletter, you can get weekly tips like these directly to your inbox.

Tell me a little bit about yourself.

This is a great opening interview question. It allows the candidate to focus on something they know a lot about (themselves) and ease them into the slightly intimidating process of interviewing. It also gives you a great jumping off point for future questions, as well as a sense of their personality. Are your kids high energy? Does the candidate mention they love to work out, swim or go on hikes in their free time? These are hints that you could be a great fit for each other. We have a long list of extra questions available in our on-boarding packet for new families, just ask to see more!

If you are a nanny and get asked this question, try not to talk too much about your qualifications at this point, the family wants to get a sense for who you are when you’re not watching their kids or working.

Why did you choose to become a nanny?

Some people fall into childcare, others seek it out. There is a big difference in the kind of care you receive from someone who genuinely loves making a difference in a child’s life compared to someone who is looking for what they deem to be an easy paycheck and fridge access. This interview question narrows down your nanny candidates.

Nannies, when asked this question in your interview, be honest! Describe what you love about working with kids and what you find rewarding about the job. When the parents see the glow in your face when you talk about watching a child grow or the opportunity to play and be creative, you’re bound to score major points with your prospective employers.

“Are your kids high energy? Does the candidate mention they love to work out, swim or go on hikes in their free time? These are hints that you could be a great fit for each other. We have a long list of extra questions available in our on-boarding packet for new families, just ask to see more!”

What do you think is the most important aspect of a nanny job?

This is a big one to ask in the interview with your nanny applicants that will weed out the worthy from the paycheck seekers. An obvious truth is keeping the child safe from danger, but the more deeply a candidate goes into their commitment to the emotional / social well-being and development of the child, the more they will allow your child to thrive with them. Their answer to this question will give you insight into the candidate’s priorities. Does the candidate place emphasis on rule-following or freedom to explore? Does the nanny believe in forming a firm bond with the child and promoting development and trust? This interview question and the answers given will help you get a better sense of who this nanny will be in your home.

If you are asked this question in your nanny interview, start by saying something like “my extensive experience as a childcare provider has shown me that of the many essential aspects of nannying, the ones I place the most importance in are….” You can also give examples of past childcare experiences and how you’ve aided a child’s growth to give the family you’re interviewing with a better sense of your priorities.

What are the qualities children see and like in you?

This nanny interview question will give you a greater insight into the personality of the candidate. Do they like to get down and play pretend, or are they more reserved? Are they silly and energetic or more nurturing and compassionate? Each child has different needs, and as a parent you know more than anyone what your child needs to thrive, and this question will help you find the perfect nanny for your child. If you aren’t sure what exactly you’re looking for from your next nanny, reach out to us and we can help you articulate your needs with a no-obligation consult.

Nannies, when asked this question, refer to your strengths like your sensitivity to the demands of children or your patience and understanding. However, be truthful! If you say in your interview that kids love you because you like to craft with them, but in reality you have no idea which end of the glue stick to use (spoiler alert – it’s the sticky part), you’d be better off leading with how you played soccer in college and kids love to play sports with you.

What do you consider to be the major challenges of a nannying job?

This is another very telling question to ask in your nanny interview. If the candidate responds saying they never have challenges with children, they either aren’t working hard enough or have never spent significant time with a child. We all know it takes a village! This question is another way of understanding the candidate’s strengths and weaknesses. If they say they have a hard time communicating or discipline is hard for them, you can know what to expect later on down the line. Care also has some great questions to ask.

If you are asked this question in your interview for a nanny position, mention an example of a past situation that challenged you, and how you overcame it. One of the most challenging parts of being a nanny is how you constantly need to adapt to different situations and different children with their many ever-changing needs. If you can show potential employers how you handle adversity and overcome it, you’re scoring major points.

We hope these nanny interview questions are of some assistance to you!

Families – have additional questions or comments about interviewing a nanny? Let us know! We would be more than happy to assist you in your interview process.

Nannies – have you had to answer some totally random interview questions? Leave a comment below!

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student, typing, keyboard, los-angeles-nannies-UPDATE-YOUR-EDUCATOR-NANNY-RESUME-teaching-child-classroom-skills-caring-professional-educated-mannies-la

UPDATE YOUR EDUCATOR NANNY RESUME TO INCLUDE YOUR TEACHING SKILLS

Updating nanny resume

As businesses begin to open back up and work from home families open their doors to their nannies, many caregivers are gathering their materials, arming themselves with their certifications, letters of recommendation, and most importantly, their resumes. In this new, extremely competitive job market, it’s imperative that nannies highlight their unique skill set in order to market themselves. After months of zoom classes and the possibility of a continuing online school year, nannies need to highlight their ability to educate as well as care, in order to stand out in a sea of applicants. The best way for nannies to rise above the rest is to highlight their educator experience in their resume.

Comparative Analysis 1

This doesn’t mean that nannies need to throw their current CV’s into the wind, but rather they need to tweak what’s already there to showcase their ability to be both nanny and tutor. Most nanny resumes are formatted as follows:
 
The Example Family, Culver City, 2010-2020
Ages of children upon hire: 3 and 7
  1. Transported children to and from school
  2. Assisted in scheduling and provided help with homework when needed
  3. Provided meals
The new, educator targeted resume edition should look like this:
 
The Example Family, Culver City, 2010-2020
Ages of children upon hire: 3 and 7
  1. Assisted in tutoring in math, science and reading
  2. Used education level appropriate tutoring techniques to help child reach targeted grades in all subjects
  3. Provided emotional and educational support, lifting child’s confidence and helping them raise their GPA by one whole letter grade
  4. Assisted with school projects that resulted in 33% average improvement in the child’s grades
  5. During the summer months, created and instructed child in fun and engaging curriculum to ready them for the school year

Comparative Analysis 2

In this example, the nanny is simply placing the attention on their educational background, rather than the overall range of care they provided.  

The key to crafting your nanny resume is in polishing what is already there. You absolutely should not fabricate any part of your resume, but you should be able to apply emphasis where needed. The same can go for coaching or art instruction:
 
Instead of:
  1. Played backyard sports
  2. Monitored arts and crafts
Try:
  1. Provided pointers and engaged the child in fun drills and exercises to improve overall skill and ability in soccer. After weeks of targeted practice, the child went from bench playing to starting in games.
  2. Based on the child’s interest in the ocean, researched and created exciting nautical crafting projects for the child to create. 

“In this new, extremely competitive job market, it’s imperative that nannies highlight their unique skill set in order to market themselves. After months of zoom classes and the possibility of a continuing online school year, nannies need to highlight their ability to educate as well as care, in order to stand out in a sea of applicants. ”

To bolster your nanny resume to highlight your educator skills, it would also behoove you to mention your own academic experience. Were you part of a peer mentoring group in high school? Did you graduate Cum Laude? Have you taught a sport or art class? Get creative! Think back on your past experiences to what parents would most like to know about how your educational experience can assist in their child’s development. If you feel like you may be lacking in this area, or you simply want to give your resume the extra push forward, sign up for an online educator class, and add it to your resume.

In Conclusion

The new nanny job market is going to be a learning curve for many nannies to navigate. Highlighting unique educational experience will be what helps many nannies stay on top of the applicant pool, and make sure that they are the first to be hired. If you are a nanny struggling with their resume, reach out to us!

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Returning to work with a nanny

Creating a Return to Work Plan for Your Nanny

Returning to work with a nanny
As zoom classes come to an end and the open abyss of a summer vacation with an empty calendar looms on the horizon, parents who are still working from home are beginning to wonder how they are going to manage it all. Shelter in place orders are being lifted, many businesses are beginning to plan to return to work, and many families are getting ready to bring their furloughed nannies back into their homes. How does a family bring a nanny back while the pandemic is still reeling? Here are some tips on how to prepare a return to work plan for your nanny:

Know the Risks

While parents may be at their wits end trying to be an entertainer, educator, parent, and work their own full time job while also managing the psychological tole of living through a pandemic, the decision to bring a nanny back must be an educated one. Now that we are a few months in, we know a little more about COVID-19 than we did originally. We know the virus is spread by close contact, specifically through the respiratory route like any other cold or flu, the main reason why we have all been social distancing for the past two months. An infected person can carry the virus for up to 14 days before they even begin to show symptoms, and can be picked up through shared air vents, contact on the street, or on high traffic surfaces. If you are a parent reading this, you may be reaching for that “How To Do it All” self help book, but if you remain vigilant, and take strong, proactive actions, you can absolutely make your nanny’s return to work safe and beneficial for all parties.

Be Honest

The first step towards a safe, healthy and happy new work agreement is honesty. It is imperative that you and your nanny are both are honest about your social activities within the last 14 days of coming back to work. If you are explicit about who you have been seeing and where you have been going, it will inspire your nanny to do the same. It is important that you both understand the risks going in and can be prepared. Set a date to work together again, and encourage that both your family and the nanny stay as quarantined as possible to reduce risk of spreading the infection. Make sure you continue to social distance even after your nanny has returned, just because you regain some sense of normalcy after a few weeks of working together does not mean you should relax in your protocol.

“A nanny’s eligibility for benefits depends greatly on the reason for unemployment, and the state will be taking a careful look at the details. You can expect to be contacted by an Unemployment Officer to tell your side of the story, as will your former employer.”

Consider Live-In

If you have a guest house or guest room, it is a great idea to extend the invitation for your nanny to live-in temporarily. This way you will both have a better understanding of where each has been and the risk of transmission will be far less. Living-in is a great way to promote bonding with your nanny and strengthen the relationship they have with your children. They can work longer hours with less of a commute and become more of an integrated role to help you and your family. It’s also a great opportunity for your children to have some much needed extra social interaction.
 

Be Realistic

Just because you and your nanny have decided to work together again does not mean that all has gone back to normal. Make sure that you are still using strict precautions, especially if the nanny is not living with you. Your family and your nanny should still be washing their hands for at least 30 seconds, avoiding sharing food and drinks, continuing to practice social distancing outside of your household, refraining from touching eyes, nose and face, and regularly cleaning and disinfecting high touch areas. As long as your family and your nanny are taking proactive actions against the spread of the virus, there should be no reason that your nanny can’t come back to work safely.

For the Future

 The CDC has recommended social distancing for a reason, but nannies are essential workers and there are ways in which your nanny can come to work safely. Continue to practice social distancing and wear your mask when you leave the house, wash hands regularly and disinfect high traffic areas. Remember to treat your nanny with respect, as they are human beings who both want to work, and want to be safe. Looking to hire a nanny?  Reach out to us  to get your search started!

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Nanny applying for unemployment

Nannies - How to File For Unemployment

Nanny applying for unemployment

Whenever we interview our nannies and ask them what they are looking for in their next employer, the majority express a desire to “feel like a family.” Unfortunately, even the most close-knit families with perfectly matched nannies eventually have to go their own ways. Children go off to school while nannies need more full time, or either party end up moving house for new opportunities. Even the most experienced, caring and impressive nannies can have a difficult time finding new employment opportunities with an ideal family. Luckily, if you’re a nanny struggling to find a new job, there are unemployment options open to you. Here’s how to file for unemployment as a nanny:

Eligibility

First, you must make sure that you are eligible for federal or state unemployment. Nannies are eligible for unemployment when they are paid legally, or on the books with taxes withheld and paid. They are also eligible when they are not dismissed for a serious infraction, which could even include consistent tardiness. Nannies are not eligible to receive unemployment if they simply quit their job.

The Application Process

Start your process as soon as possible. Applying within the first week of termination ensures that you will not lose any benefits. Each state has different qualifications and requirements to receive unemployment. More details for state to state processes and how to begin them can be found here. 

“A nanny’s eligibility for benefits depends greatly on the reason for unemployment, and the state will be taking a careful look at the details. You can expect to be contacted by an Unemployment Officer to tell your side of the story, as will your former employer.”

Gather Information

Nationwide, you will be asked about your employment information. You will need the dates of your employment, your salary, and any documentation that describes your unemployment situation, like the nature of your termination. In California, employers must give a written letter explaining an employee’s termination. The reason for nannies will most likely be along the lines of the child outgrew the needs for a full time caregiver and will be attending school.

Give Details

A nanny’s eligibility for benefits depends greatly on the reason for unemployment, and the state will be taking a careful look at the details. You can expect to be contacted by an Unemployment Officer to tell your side of the story, as will your former employer. Nannies who were fired for serious infractions will have a much harder time receiving benefits than one who was let go because the family could no longer afford help.

If You’re Approved

If you’re approved, congrats! However, employers still have the right to appeal a decision, as one unemployment claim could potentially increase the likelihood of future claims. Should this happen, you will be notified of a hearing, which is done rarely in person and usually takes place over the phone.

If You’re Denied

If you are a nanny denied unemployment, you have the same rights to appeal as an employer does. Ask your representative for a second look, and a hearing, also via phone, will likely be called.

Still Look For Work

Unemployment is not a permanent paycheck. The government expects that you should be using your time to apply to jobs weekly. The government can offer you assistance via Unemployment Officers who can assist you in applying to new childcare jobs. It will help your case greatly in avoiding an audit to keep a written record of resumes sent, potential employers spoken to, jobs applied for and interviews conducted. Check out our current listings here. Care.com and SitterCity are also great, free resources for nannies to find work.

What Happens to Your Former Employer When You File?

For nannies who had the ideal relationship with their former employers, they may experience some hesitation in applying for unemployment, for fear of burdening their former family with fees or extra work. Upon filing for unemployment, families will receive a notice of an open claim, but they are under no obligation to act in any way. However, they do have the right to confirm or deny the details you laid out stating the facts of your termination with them and thereby refute your claim for unemployment, so be sure that you are truthful in your application.

For the Future

Nannies should always keep records of your job, especially because it is unlikely to have Human Resources in a domestic setting. It’s a great idea to log times worked, details of any negative incidents, copies of pay stubs and any positive reviews which can help you should you ever have to file for unemployment again.

If you are a nanny now seeking unemployment benefits and need any assistance in the process, please do not hesitate to reach out to us with any questions. Please also check out Homework Solutions, who has fantastic resources available to you

 

Have you been through this situation with something to share? Let us know below.

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