Los Angeles Nannies

Being a parent

Childcare Philosophies

When looking for a nanny for your child you may find yourself more concerned with scheduling and transportation than with child rearing philosophies. However, understanding the philosophy that would best work for your family can greatly assist in finding the right nanny, and for ensuring that your child has consistent care. Once you understand which philosophy works best for your family, you can skew your nanny search based on this philosophy, creating consistent and optimized care for your child. Below are the top early developmental child care philosophies.

Montessori

Montessori is one of the most popular childcare systems. Founded in 1907 by Maria Montessori, the idea is that children are in control of their own education, with teachers acting as aids or guides. On a daily basis, children participate in hands-on activities in which toys are tools designed for specific purposes to guide their learning about a specific subject. Montessori also encourages children to take personal responsibility for their wellbeing, fostering independence by making their own snacks, taking care of their own belongings and cleaning up after themselves. Children learn at their own pace, focusing on individual learning and creating a healthy atmosphere.

RIE

Resources for Infant Educarers or RIE is the philosophy that the most important education in a child’s early life is the care and connection that they feel with their caregivers. The idea is that the foundation of a child’s learning is based off of how safe and respected they feel. Educating a child through caring allows them to learn about themselves, to feel seen and understood, and feel like they matter in the world. RIE is not only designed to educate children but parents and caregivers as well. Through caring for the child, parents learn to trust themselves and their child, creating a strong bond between the two.

“Are your kids high energy? Does the candidate mention they love to work out, swim or go on hikes in their free time? These are hints that you could be a great fit for each other. We have a long list of extra questions available in our on-boarding packet for new families, just ask to see more!”

Waldorf

The Waldorf method focuses on dependable routine. Teachers are often with the same group of children for up to eight years, creating and nurturing trusting and secure relationships. Through comfortable furnishings and play areas, the Waldorf atmosphere is intended to feel like home. There is also a heavy emphasis on creative learning, such as arts, crafts, music, theater and cooking. The idea is that children thrive in comfort, and the Waldorf method uses the home-like atmosphere and dependable routine to allow children to thrive.

Reggio Emilia

Similar to Montessori, children are their own agents in learning with Reggio Emilia. Children are encouraged to explore their interests while teachers guide them to create projects based on their enthusiasms. The focus is also on creativity and the arts, with projects and daily play documented so that parents and caregivers can remain on the same page and monitor their child’s development.

High/Scope

High/Scope is the inverse of Waldorf where the emphasis is placed not on social or emotional development but academic success. Instead of creative pursuits, children are directed more towards mathematics and linguistics. Children learn collaboratively with teachers and it is an excellent route for children who work best one on one and for children with special needs.

Bank Street

Bank Street was founded in 1916 based off of the philosophies of Lucy Sprague Mitchell and is great for children who learn best in an environment lacking structure. In Bank Street teaching, the classroom is the world around us and is considered to be the biggest tool in a child’s learning. Children are regarded as active learners as lessons are focused on the social sciences; history, geography and anthropology. Artistic and scientific lessons are taught within the context of cultural applications, creating an integrated curriculum. Children are encouraged to exercise their imaginations, and have the opportunity to choose to work alone or in groups, with teachers acting as guides rather than leaders. 

Religious

If faith-based learning is right for your family, many churches and religious schools offer preschool programs. The philosophy followed in any given religious school may differ, and the religious content taught may vary. Be sure to speak to the school about the program offered, as well as details on their curriculum and philosophy.

At Los Angeles Nannies we source and vet a wide range of nannies with differing backgrounds who have extensive experience in early childhood education. Let us know which childcare philosophy works best for you and we can find a nanny who is an expert and a perfect match for your family.

Nanny

What Your Nanny Is - And Isn't

Nanny

According to the Oxford Dictionary, the definition of a nanny is “a person… employed to care for a child in its own home.” A nanny’s main responsibility is to care for a child’s emotional, physical, intellectual and social wellbeing, yet many nannies are often asked to perform household duties that are outside of the childcaring sphere, such as cooking, cleaning, scheduling and shopping. 

What is acceptable to ask your nanny to do?

When thinking about the job duties you wish to ask your nanny to accomplish, it is imperative that you ask yourself whether or not that duty will contribute to or detract from their ability to care for your child. 

Cooking

It is well within your nanny’s responsibility to feed your child at appropriate and necessary times during their scheduled shift. A nanny may prepare multiple meals and snacks for your child throughout their working day. The grey area begins however, when the nanny is asked to cook for your whole family. It is one thing to request that a nanny prep for your dinner while a child is at school or napping, but if a nanny is forced into the responsibility of preparing and cooking for a family of four while also assisting the child with their homework, it is easy to imagine that the immediacy of the meal takes precedence and the homework suffers. The nanny is there first and foremost to assist in the development and rearing of the child, and if cooking takes away from that responsibility, then it should be forgone.

Cleaning

Many families ask their nanny to engage in light housekeeping. This is completely acceptable when the duties are related to the child. Sanitizing and organizing toys, tidying and disinfecting the high chair and surrounding areas, loading the dishwasher after snack and meal time, restocking and cleaning the changing table, and even the child’s laundry are all things that are reasonable and even encouraged to ask your nanny to do. Having your nanny tidy your child’s room with your child present is a great way to teach your child by example the importance of organization and cleanliness. Most light cleaning tasks regarding the child can be done during your child’s nap or while they are at school. It is important to reiterate that any cleaning that takes away from your caregiver’s ability to nurture and comfort your child to the best of their ability should not be asked of them.

When thinking about the job duties you wish to ask your nanny to accomplish, it is imperative that you ask yourself whether or not that duty will contribute to or detract from their ability to care for your child. 

Laundry

Issues arise around the job duties when expectations are not made clear from the get-go. Many nannies expect and even welcome the task of doing the child’s laundry, as folding warm, clean clothes while the child is napping is sometimes considered a cherished repreve. However, the idea of washing their employer’s underwear can make some nannies, extremely uncomfortable. The addition of expensive clothing that needs extra precautions during the washing process can add unnecessary stress and time to the nanny’s day as well. It is one thing if you are in a pinch and ask your nanny if they are comfortable doing a load of your own laundry, it is different to consistently throw in your washing without having had a clear discussion beforehand. There are many simple and cost efficient ways to get one’s laundry done.

Pet care

A nanny is a childcare provider, not a dog-walker or cat-medicine-administrator. If a nanny has to be thinking about the dog’s needs while a child is having a tantrum, it can be difficult for the nanny to give the child the full attention and care that they need while the dog is endangering a priceless rug or a corner of the couch. Letting the dog out in the backyard or refilling it’s water is one thing, but asking a nanny to groom is not within their job title. Some nannies may be allergic to pets or even have a fear of animals. It is important to discuss your pet care needs with your nanny prior to starting so that everyone can be on the same page.

Many domestic issues can be sorted out simply by having a clear discussion about expectations upon hiring. Ask your nanny during the interview process what they are comfortable with and what their domestic strengths are. If you lay out the expectations from the get-go, it will greatly avoid any awkwardness or resentment down the road.

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BLack Lives Matter

The past few weeks has seen the nation erupt in protest over the horrific injustice of police brutality resulting in the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and now Rayshard Brooks. Robert Fuller and Malcolm Harsch were both found dead in similar circumstances within 10 days of one another. Black Lives Matter is on everyone’s mind as protesters everywhere are asking for fundamental change. There is a reckoning for racial justice at every level, CEO’s of major companies are stepping down amidst backlash, petitions are sprouting like wildflowers. Everywhere you look, on street corners, social media, store windows, and impromptu gatherings on the streets, there are Black Lives Matter signs and chants. Schools have conveniently white washed America’s racist history to make it more palatable for white people. So how do we talk to our children about Black Lives Matter in a healthy, positive way, while remaining truthful about the significance of what’s going on?

Explain Race

The topic of race is uncomfortable, and never easy to discuss. Why are people discriminated against? Why doesn’t everyone have the same opportunities? Why do people hurt each other? Many white parents may think, “if I don’t talk about racial stereotypes or biases, then my children won’t have any.” That’s like saying “I don’t see color.” Color shouldn’t be ignored, it should be embraced. When we don’t talk about what’s going on around us, children form their own ideas based off of what they’re seeing and hearing. Children will notice that all of the faces of people on picket signs are Black, and they will notice that their murderers were white. Children of all races will naturally have anxiety about their roles in this, Black children will wonder “will my dad be next?” while white children will fear that they are inherently aggressors. These fears will not manifest on a conscious level, so it’s important for parents to express their care and concern and create a safe space for children to talk about their feelings. Ask children what they’ve noticed about Black Lives Matter. What have they seen? How do they feel? What do they think is going on? What are their friends saying? Do they have any questions? Educate yourself as much as you can on Black history and the history of racism in America so that you can answer as truthfully as possible.

Explain Black Lives Matter

A major and misguided response to Black Lives Matter is that “all lives matter.” While obviously all lives are inherently valuable and sacred, not all lives are being threatened like Black lives are.    This can easily be explained to children with an anecdote of a house fire. If your neighbor’s house is on fire, it needs special attention to put the fire out. Firemen come and use hoses to put the fire out. If your other neighbor who’s house is not on fire claims that “all houses matter” and the house that is on fire is no more important or deserving of attention than the others, that doesn’t make much sense, does it? The house that is on fire is in the most danger, and needs the most attention to fix it. It’s the same for Black lives. They are in the most danger, and need the most help.

“Create a sense of safety and stability so that they can feel more comfortable about their role in the world. Let them know that they can make a difference and that there are concrete, tangible action steps that they can take.”

It’s Okay Not to Have the Answer

While having these difficult conversations, encourage children to come up with their own ideas on how to help. It’s important that they are able to exercise their creativity while drawing their own conclusions, and it’s very important that parents encourage this. A strong trusting relationship will build the foundation for the future. Don’t worry about saying the “right” thing to your children, instead embrace the fact that we’re all human and we’re always learning what does and doesn’t work all time time.

Take Action and Inspire Hope

What can be incredibly discouraging for children is when they ask “why is the world they way it is?” And parents respond with, “that’s just the way the world works.” This sets a standard not only of doom, but also of immobility. If children are not made to feel like the world can change, if they feel like the world isn’t fair and that there’s nothing they can do, this will cause anxiety and even depression. What’s the point of growing up in a world where there is injustice and there’s nothing anyone can do about it? Instead, inspire your children to take action. Create a sense of safety and stability so that they can feel more comfortable about their role in the world. Let them know that they can make a difference and that there are concrete, tangible action steps that they can take. Having a plan and being able to take action will greatly decrease their anxiety and having an active role will boost their confidence and self esteem.

It’s a Movement not a Moment

While our news outlets and social media feeds will eventually begin to go back to normal, there is still fundamental change that needs to happen on every level in our society in order for Black lives to be safe and valued. Keep talking with your children about what you can do to promote racial justice and equity even after the social media trends die down. Watch shows and read books about race, encourage diversity at your child’s school and in their extracurriculars, volunteer in your community, buy from Black owned businesses and restaurants
Children are our future, and every child regardless of their race, gender, or orientation should be given the resources they need in order to thrive in this world. Reach out to us with any questions or concerns about speaking to your child about Black Lives Matter. 

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Talking to kids about Race

Racism and Children

Talking to kids about Race
Racism is taught. Racism is learned. Racism is not inherent. Right now, it’s not enough to be against racism, one has to be anti-racist. It is a lifelong fight for equity and basic human rights for Black people. Racism and children needs to be discussed.
One of the first lessons a white or white passing child learns is how to dial 911. We tell them that if there is any ever trouble to call the police, the police will help them and keep them safe. Black children, on the other hand, learn that keeping themselves safe looks very different.
 

“Remember that children learn by example. If you are preaching inclusivity while benefiting from a system that oppresses others, what are you really showing your children? Talking to your children about racism shouldn’t be a one time thing, it should be a continued, open conversation in which you both honestly evaluate your actions and beliefs.”

While we watch the news and talk to our friends and relatives about police brutality, racism and protests, children are listening. Children’s developing, inquisitive minds that seek to relate and understand are forming their own ideas based off of what they hear on TV, what they hear their parents say, and how they see their parents act. Often what they are absorbing now is not processed on a conscious level but ingrained in their minds, which is why its imperative that these conversations are had to steer their minds in a positive way. While the topic of race is uncomfortable, don’t be the parent who avoids the topic of race because you’re not sure how to handle it. It’s okay to be uncomfortable right now, because that discomfort brings change.

Equip your child with the tools they need to grow up and be an adult who stands up against and actively fights racism. Raise a child who will be a mediator, a peacemaker. Raise a child who makes a safe space for everyone.

Heal Yourself

How does one raise such a child? By first acknowledging and dealing with your own biases. Unlearning white supremacy and white privilege is a difficult task which can and will be deeply painful. Do it for your children and for George Floyd’s daughter. Do it for all of the Black children who are not taught to call 911 because the police pose the most danger to them. Read books and watch movies curated by BI and POC. Learn about how our systems in America are built on slavery and profit off of the oppression of Black lives. Understand systemic racism and how school districts are segregated. Think back to the times in your life where you exercised your privilege for your own advantage. It will be painful. Do it for your children. If you don’t uproot and unlearn your biases, they will stick with you and show their head when you least expect it, and that will be what your child sees and learns from. Children learn from example, don’t say one thing about race and then show them something different. 

Talking to Children Under 5

Young children learning about their place in the world will point out differences they notice in people. This is done usually in an embarrassing and uncomfortable way for parents in public. Rather than silencing your child when they point out these differences, embrace and celebrate them. “Mommy, that woman’s hair is in braids!” “Yes sweetie, and aren’t they beautiful? They are a symbol of her culture.” Resist the urge to shush or shame them, this will only begin the process of internalization and will make them feel like they can’t come to you with questions and create a stigma around “otherness.” When describing racism to your children of this age, refer to it as being “unfair.” That BIPOC are treated unfairly in the workplace, on the streets, by doctors, and police. Children understand the concept of fairness and this will resonate with them on a tangible emotional level they can comprehend. This will also inspire their beautiful young hearts to want to take action. Encourage them in doing so. Read them books about racism and watch age appropriate content.

Children Aged 5 through 11

Older, elementary aged children can be more difficult to speak to racism about. They understand more and their questions can be intimidating or hard to answer for parents. That is okay. Recognize within yourself that you won’t have all the answers. It’s okay to say “I don’t know,” to a question they have. If you find that’s the case, make a plan for the both of you to investigate together. Make it a learning experience to go out and find your answers about race. Find out what they’re not learning in school, or what is being covered up. Encourage them to give a classroom presentation on what they’ve learned. Being open and honest with your child builds trust and encourages them to seek out the answers they don’t have. Discuss with them what they are seeing in the news and on their own social media. Ask them what their friends are saying and their opinion on it. Unpack any stereotyping or biases that your child or your child’s friends are beginning to form. Remember that racism is learned, not inherent, and can be imposed upon by peer pressure. Do not shame your child or your child’s friends for their thoughts, but steer them in the right direction of thinking with guided questions.

For Kids 11 years+

Pre-teens know a lot more about the world. Their history classes, while undoubtedly skewed to avoid the real race issues pervasive in American History, will have taught them something about discrimination. Usually along the lines of “we had slaves, we abolished slavery and everything was fine! Then Martin Luther King came and everything was great for Black people!” A dangerous and blatantly incorrect curriculum designed to keep the truth from children who benefit from that very oppressive system. Find out what your child knows about racism in school and let them talk, listening to understand, not to respond. Depending on the school, your child may be angry at the injustice, allow them to feel this. Don’t try to tell them “it’ll all be okay” but rather encourage action. Get involved in your local chapter of Black Lives Matter. Research policies in your local government that suppress Black voices, like lack of affordable housing in areas with higher funded schools and make a plan to take action. Volunteer, encourage diversity. Children are natural empathizers. Encourage them to think about how their lives would be different if they were the subjects of systemic and ingrained racial injustice. You may want to protect your child from these “negative” emotions and truths about the world, but the truth is that children are our future and children will save the world. Create children who grow into caring allies
 

Remember that children learn by example. If you are preaching inclusivity while benefiting from a system that oppresses others, what are you really showing your children? Talking to your children about racism shouldn’t be a one time thing, it should be a continued, open conversation in which you both honestly evaluate your actions and beliefs. While this is a time of pain, anger, and injustice, it is also an opportunity for growth, inclusion and coming together.

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Nanny employee rights

Employment Rights All Nannies Need to Know

Nanny employee rights

Since nannies work in the private homes of their employers it’s often mistakenly assumed that they are not protected by labor and tax laws. While not all labor and tax laws apply to household employers because they employ less than the minimum number of employees required before they kick in, many of them do; and it’s great to know your employment rights.

According to the International Nanny Association, all nannies, whether they are legally authorized to accept employment in the United States or not, are protected by these 10 basic employment rights. 

Nannies must be paid for every hour that they work.

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, whether live-in or live-out, nannies must be paid for each hour that they work.

‘If a nanny files a claim for unpaid wages or abuse, an employer may not turn their nanny in for an immigration violation. The Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration & Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) has written rules that prohibit their interference in labor disputes.’

Nannies are entitled to be paid minimum wage.

All nannies are entitled to be paid at the state or federal minimum wage rate, whichever rate is higher.

Live-out nannies, and some live-in nannies, are entitled to overtime pay.

Live-out nannies are entitled to be paid overtime at the rate of 1.5 times their hourly base rate for all hours worked over 40 in a seven day period. Live-in nannies, in some states, are also entitled to be paid overtime.

Nannies must receive a W-2 form at the end of each year.

Nannies are not independent contractors; they are employees of the families for whom they work. Nannies who earn more than $1,800 per calendar year (2012 threshold) must be given a form W-2 and not a form 1099.

Nanny employers are required to withhold payroll deductions.

These deductions include Social Security and Medicare and state taxes. Income taxes and other benefits, such as contributions to health insurance premiums, may be withheld if the nanny and employer agree.

Nannies are entitled to be paid regularly.

Each state determines the maximum number of days between payroll dates and the maximum delay an employer may place on a nanny’s periodic payroll. Some states even dictate the frequency in which nannies must be paid. The employer must keep accurate payroll records, including the dates and hours worked, for three years.

Nanny employers are required to have Workers’ Compensation policies in states that require it.

Workers’ Compensation provides financial assistance to nannies who are hurt on the job. Most states require nanny employers to have a Worker’s Compensation policy, though not all of them do.

Nanny employers are entitled to work in an environment free from abuse.

Federal and state laws protect nannies from physical and sexual abuse by their employers.

Nanny employers cannot confiscate a nanny’s passport or any other identifying documentation.

Nanny employers cannot take and keep a nanny’s passport, Social Security card, work permit, or driver’s license.

Nanny employers are not allowed to retaliate against nannies from workplace grievances by turning them into immigration.

If a nanny files a claim for unpaid wages or abuse, an employer may not turn their nanny in for an immigration violation. The Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration & Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE) has written rules that prohibit their interference in labor disputes.

Want to share a story with us regarding your employment rights? Comment below.

Homework Solutions is our preferred payroll provider and has mountains of resources for domestic employers and employees

The International Nanny Association is a non-profit educational association. For more information about nanny employee rights, click here 

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What is tiktok

What is TIKTOK?

What is tiktok
As a Nanny Agency made up of millennials, we like to think of ourselves experts on two things: kids and social media. Growing up we beta tested MySpace, Facebook, Instagram and SnapChat and like to think of ourselves as both social media savvy and technologically capable of staying safe on the internet. However, one thing still eludes us: TikTok. It seems TikTok is a seemingly harmless platform made for kids and teens to share and watch quick videos of dances and learn how to do pranks on their parents. But like all things on the internet, it can be exploited by people with ulterior motives. So what is TikTok? We don’t know. But we can tell you what we do know about the company, it’s technology, and how you can ensure that your kids stay safe while using it.

The Basics

TikTok is a free social networking app designed to allow users to create and share original videos. The social aspect surrounds the ability to follow other accounts and like, comment and share videos. The capacity for videos and accounts to go viral is large on TikTok, and many new household names have appeared from popular accounts on the app. TikTok is a fun way for kids to get creative, learn the basics of cinematography, get exercise from learning viral dances, and occasionally learn unique life hacks, science experiments or history facts. Like all social media, TikTok is not inherently good nor evil, but it’s the way in which it’s used that can become dangerous or beneficial for kids.

“Are your kids high energy? Does the candidate mention they love to work out, swim or go on hikes in their free time? These are hints that you could be a great fit for each other. We have a long list of extra questions available in our on-boarding packet for new families, just ask to see more!”

Safety

In 2019 TikTok settled for millions after federal regulators charged it with violating the children’s privacy law. TikTok does not have an age limit in order to use the app. When signing up for an account, TIkTok asks that users input their birthdays. Kids who are truthful and sign up as 13 and under, receive curated, clean videos and aren’t allowed to post, comment or search. This is obviously not any fun, however, and kids can easily be remedy this by inputting a false birthday. Accounts can be made private, but that only limits who can watch your kids, and not what your kids can watch. TikTok does have parental controls where adults can manage screen time, block inappropriate content and disable direct messaging. However, kids are smart and know they can simply undo whatever their caretakers set up for them or simply delete and re-download the app. So what can parents and caregivers do to keep their kids safe on TikTok?

If you can’t beat them join them

The easiest way to make sure your kids are staying safe on TikTok is by joining them in the fun. If you set strict boundaries condemning their online use, that will only drive them to sneak around you, which in the end could get them into more harm than good. Instead, monitor your kids on TikTok by getting involved. Showing that you are interested in their interests, rather than shaming them or punishing them, not only fosters their confidence and creates a healthy relationship with social media, but also allows you both to create a new opportunity for a shared experience. As they say, keep your friends close and your enemies closer. The closer you can be to your child’s TikTok usage, the safer they will be and the more informed you are. Not only will you appear way cooler than other caregivers, but the trust you form by accepting their interests rather than trying to control them, will set up a life-long foundation of dependability.

TikTok Challenges

The average TikTok feed is full of viral challenges that each user has the opportunity to get creative with. Challenges can be dances, songs, or activities that encourage users to copy in their own unique way. It’s a really fun way for kids to exercise their creativity. Many schools have cut funding for music, art and dance, and TikTok is a platform that can immerse kids in their interests by providing project-like opportunities for them to express themselves that they wouldn’t get in school. The downside to this is that the praise or rejection they receive on their self expression is very tangible in terms of likes, views and comments. This social transparency is another reason why it’s a good idea to have an open dialogue with your kids so you can talk about this praise/rejection ratio in a healthy way that allows them to learn both resilience and confidence. 
 
Engaging in a TikTok challenge with your child is an awesome opportunity to get creative together. Get the blood flowing by learning a dance. Get creative by trying a science challenge. Offer to hold the camera while they do their thing. Use it as an opportunity to let them direct you and learn leadership skills. Show them that what they are doing matters. By encouraging them in their creative pursuits, you are setting them up for a life time of success by saying “I see you and value you”. You may think that something as silly as a social media app wouldn’t have that big of an impact on your child’s personal development, but to a child, these creative pursuits are their way of feeling seen in the world and learning their place in it. Whatever the challenge is that sparks your kids creativity, do it together and enjoy the opportunity to strengthen your bond.
 

So what is TikTok?

We still couldn’t tell you. But what we can tell you is that being present in social media is the new way of the world, and it’s important for your kids to feel like they can be part of the pack, in their own unique way. Protect your kids by being an active part of their life. Support them, encourage them, and be there for them when they need you. If you have any questions about your kids and TikTok or social media in general (MySpace, anyone?) do not hesitate to reach out to us. 

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Homeschool and tutoring kids

Homeschooling / How to Homeschool Nanny Kids

Homeschool and tutoring kids

Many career nannies know that the time between drop off and pick up at school is sacred. The school hours are where nannies can do laundry, schedule appointments, sanitize toys, and gear up for an afternoon of homework help. We’ve seen how the recent change in the childcare industry has affected nannies with parents working from home, but homeschooling has had just as significant an impact. How can nannies navigating in this new zoom school territory succeed?

Here are some tips:

Brush up on your educator skills

Nannying while kids are homeschooling means that you will inevitably become teacher yourself. Remain patient, ask leading questions, and always help them come to their conclusions and assignments on their own. Doing tasks for them is not going to do anyone any favors. If they don’t respond to a certain explanation, try and show them another way that they will understand. The beauty of being a nanny and a teacher is that you know the kids and their interests much better than a teacher would be able to. Spark their creativity by using dinosaurs as metaphors for counting if they’re into paleontology right now. Let them practice letters by writing their favorite words. If you don’t know how to answer a certain question, there is a wonderful new invention called Google. Of course, be sly about when you look things up, kids learn by example and we can’t have them copping out via the convenience of search engines.

“We are in uncharted territory, and all of these big changes can be really difficult for children to digest. When it gets hard, remember that your focus is on being a caregiver. The child’s grades are not a reflection of you or your nannying abilities, so remain compassionate and patient, as confidence and care are the main foundations for a child’s academic success ”

Create a classroom environment

A similar issue with nannies working around work from home parents is spacial boundaries. Kids are used to having their entire homes be just that – their home. But now their sacred-kid-space has been turned into office, home and school all in one and this can become stressful and confusing for developing minds. Designate a specific classroom area where kids will do their learning. Kids need structure and boundaries in order to thrive, and knowing that the dining room or a specific section of the living room is now their “school section” of the home will help them focus their energy to that specific task. Spruce up the area maybe with posters or familiar classroom objects to help them feel more at ease. Take breaks and eat snacks away from the classroom area to better help them adjust and concentrate while they are working.

Remain compassionate

We are in uncharted territory, and all of these big changes can be really difficult for children to digest. When it gets hard, remember that your focus is on being a caregiver. The child’s grades are not a reflection of you or your nannying abilities, so remain compassionate and patient, as confidence and care are the main foundations for a child’s academic success. It is also imperative that you have patience and compassion for yourself. You are a nanny and not necessarily an educator, so it may take some time for you to get into the swing of things. Remember your first day as a nanny, and how far you’ve come since then. Your educator skills will grow exponentially as well, which is a great thing to have on your nanny resume for future opportunities.
 
Nannying has always been fraught with rewarding challenges. If you are a nanny currently providing care to homeschooling children, we’d love to hear your stories of success and struggle alike. As always, reach out to us with any questions or concerns.
eas and tips on how to make every day equally fun and educational. There are a ton of awesome nanny blogs for creative solutions, as well as nannying groups you can join on social media.

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Nanny while working from home

How to Nanny With Stay at Home Parents

Nanny while working from home

Being a nanny with a parent working from home can be a challenge for many reasons. For some children, it can be difficult to adjust to a new nanny or caregiver. It takes time for the bonds to form and for trust to blossom. This can be especially difficult when one or both parents are also working from home. Some children may defer to a parent if they’re just in the other room, to the horror of many caregivers who know that parent happens to be on a conference call. As a new or long-term nanny who finds themselves caregiving alongside a work from home parent, how can you set the boundaries needed for the child to thrive?

Communicate!

While the child is not present, have a conversation with the work from home parent. If the child frequently calls upon the parent during the day, ask the parent to verbally defer to you so that the child hears from their own mouth that you are the authority on all matters. Some parents may not mind being sought out during the day, but it is important that as the caregiver during your working hours, your authority is not undermined in the eyes of the child. Our Honest House Promise details what a positive, healthy working environment looks like for all. Ask the parent leading questions so you both can be on the same page and avoid any awkwardness in front of the child. Some questions to consider:

  • How do we handle mealtimes and bathroom breaks where you and the child are in the same space?
  • Do the children need to play in areas away from where you will be working? Does the noise level matter?
  • If you plan on interacting with the children during the day, how involved would you like me to be? Is there a task, such as laundry or meal prep, that could get done while you interact with them?
  • If the child needs comfort, at what point would you like to be notified or involved?

Leading questions can help set the foundations for a positive and productive working environment for all. If the idea of communication sets your stomach into knots, here are some effective tips on better communication.

Establish a routine

It is no secret that children thrive under a routine. The idea of having a parent working from home while a caregiver is present may be a novel idea to them, and they will try and push the boundaries to see how they relate in this new environment. Children will want to update their parents during the day, showing them what they made and telling them a funny joke, especially since they’re just in the other room! But designating times throughout the day, such as meal time or “hand off” time where children know that they will have an opportunity to see their parents, can assist nannies in quelling the child’s urge to barge in on the parent’s zoom call to tell them about the especially tasty grape they ate. Here are CDC tips on establishing routines for children.

Being a nanny with a parent working from home can be a challenge for many reasons. For some children, it can be difficult to adjust to a new nanny or caregiver. It takes time for the bonds to form and for trust to blossom.

Create designated areas in the home

Having a “kids section” and a “parents’ work section” can greatly assist in creating the types of spacial boundaries children understand and relate to. Discuss with the parents areas that are “off limits” for the kids and request that you both enforce that with equal measure, ensuring that the message hits home. Having specific play areas that are unique to the child will help make the bitter pill of not being allowed in a certain area easier to swallow.

Recognize that bonding may take longer

If a child has the choice to be comforted by someone they just met vs. the parent in the other room, they will of course choose the parent. If you are having difficulties forming a bond while a parent is working from home, ask the parent to help you form trust with the child by reassuring the child that you are there for them and you can be trusted. If the parent is verbally reaffirming their choice in you, the child will have an easier time opening up. Engage with the child as much as possible during this period, and if feasible, take them on outings where they can more easily recognize you as the caregiver.

Be ready for parents "popping in"

Having a parent that works from home who frequently checks in can make it difficult to establish authority and trust with the child, and can sometimes lead to meltdowns and disruption of activities. This is why it’s imperative that you create firm boundaries and communicate with the parent your needs as a nanny and stick to the schedule as much as possible. 

There will always be a learning curve when nannying while a parent is working from home. In any relationship, communication is key. Make sure that you and the parent have an opportunity to voice your needs and expectations so that a clear routine and schedule may be formed to allow the child to thrive and avoid any meltdowns or confusion. At the end of the day, as a nanny you are there to create a safe and loving environment for the child and it is important that both you and the parents remember that often. Look at these tips for developing a happy and healthy parent – nanny relationship.

If you have any questions or concerns or are having a difficult time performing your nanny duties while a parent is working from home, reach out to us and we will do our best to assist you.

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Nannies during COVID

COVID-19 and Children

Nannies during COVID

The spread of misinformation can be just as contagious and equally as toxic as any pandemic. When it comes to protecting our children, who can we trust and how can we take preventative measures? Referring to the Center for Disease Control, who’s only bias is keeping the population healthy, is usually our best bet. Here is what the CDC has to say about COVID-19 and our children:

Will my child get sick?

In most cases, children and the elderly are most affected by disease, due to their sensitive immune systems. However, the CDC says “based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults.” While some children have fallen ill, the vast majority of cases have been found in adults, seemingly going against the grain of the usual fear that children would fall into the category of high risk people.

How can I take actions to protect my child?

Protecting your child from COVID-19 is no different from teaching your child regulatory health precautions.

  • Have them frequently wash their hands with soap and warm water for at least 30 seconds and use hand sanitizer frequently. Encourage them to avoid touching their eyes, nose, mouth, ears and face with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid people who are sick, especially if they are coughing or sneezing.
  • Clean and disinfect high traffic surfaces in your house such as doorknobs, tables, chairs, counters, handles, light switches, desks, toilets, and sinks. It would also behoove you to disinfect technology like phones, iPads and gaming systems.
  • Wash clothes and plush toys on the highest possible heat setting with the appropriate amount of detergent.

“”Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose, and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea have also been reported. It’s not known yet whether some children may be at higher risk for severe illness, for example, children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs.” says the CDC”

How will I know if my child is sick?

COVID-19 symptoms in children do not differ from adults, except in that they tend to be milder. “Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose, and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea have also been reported. It’s not known yet whether some children may be at higher risk for severe illness, for example, children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs.” says the CDC. As there have been few reported cases of the virus in children, it is difficult to say exactly how they will be affected, there is still much to be learned about the virus’s impact on children.

Should I have my child wear a face mask?

The CDC says no, only those who have the illness or symptoms of the illness should wear masks and it is not necessary for children to wear them preventatively.

Disease can be frightening, especially when there are so many more questions than there are answers. Remember that as long as you and your children are washing your hands and staying away from those that are ill, you are doing the best you can. We are not health care experts, but if you have any further questions or concerns, feel free to reach out to us.

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