School & education

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Reasons You're Not Getting Hired - And What to do About it

When you’re applying for jobs, do you feel like you’re sending your resume and covering letter out into the abyss, never to be seen or heard from again? Well we’ve compiled a list of reasons why you may not be getting hired, and how to empower yourself to change that.

You're not being proactive.

Are you waiting for the perfect job and the perfect employer to just jump into your inbox? While this is the ideal, this unfortunately is not the reality. If you feel under-qualified for your next move, take an online course. We recommend these nanny courses to stay in the know. For nannies, volunteer at an after school program or local community center. LA Works has a huge database of volunteer opportunities to choose from and you can search by category. Taking classes and volunteering will spice up your resume and give you a seamless opportunity to find the next perfect family, or someone who knows one. If you’re feeling stuck, get moving! The rest will fall into place.

Your lack of passion shows.

Potential employers can feel whether or not you’re applying just to apply. If you’re excited about a job- let it show in the cover letter! Does the job description mention that the child loves dinosaurs? Mention that you’ve volunteered at the Museum of Natural History. Families don’t want to bring someone on board who’s only looking for a paycheck, they want someone who’s passionate and enthusiastic and will enrich their child’s life, right from the get-go.

“You know what they say: “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” Most families love to hire people they already know, or who their current nanny recommends upon leaving. It’s important to put yourself out there by volunteering or maintaining contacts and references to increase your chances of being hired. A family would always much rather hire a nanny that was recommended to them than someone they found on the internet.”

You're not selling yourself.

Advocating for oneself does not always come naturally, but if there’s ever a time to push your worth, it’s when you’re job hunting. There’s a fine line between cocky and confident, but families want to know why you’re fit for the job. They could be looking through hundreds of resumes, so you’ll want to stand out by detailing your education, skills and experience, tailored based on their job posting. Here is a link to our template resume to help you get off to a good start.

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Your resume and covering letter don’t show your value to the family.

Your resume and your covering letter are your chance to show why you are qualified for the job. Make sure they both include relevant information and key words specified in the job description. If your resume just says “Babysitter for the Jones Family”, that doesn’t give a potential family too much to go off. Mention how you managed the child’s schedule and hosted play dates. The more specific, the better. If you don’t mention key specific points about the job in your cover letter, it sends off the message to potential families that you either didn’t read the job description or didn’t take the time to specify your letter. Don’t give off the impression of being lazy or disinterested and take the time to tailor your application to each job. This will show that you’re interested and proactive!

You conveyed a sense of entitlement at the interview.

It is incredibly appropriate to advocate for yourself, and we encourage this to the highest level, however it is important to be wary of your tone and attitude while selling yourself. Arrogance and rigidity are not traits potential employers look for in a nanny. It’s one thing to have a set salary, but to demand perks right from the get-go sends a red flag to the employer. After all, if you’re demanding in the interview, what kind of role model would you be for the children once you’re taking care of them?

You’re overqualified, or underqualified!

If you send a family a detailed resume about how you were the CEO of marketing for 15 years, that shows you’re qualified for marketing, but doesn’t mean you have any idea how to take care of a child. If parents and guardians are going to entrust their child’s life to your hands, they need to see that you have experience with children. The same goes for the inverse, if you’re a long term career nanny, they may want someone who is willing to grow and learn with their family, instead of someone who may be set in their ways. This is where your cover letter comes in handy to fill in the gaps of how you may be coming off to potential employers.

You’re not connected in the industry.

You know what they say: “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” Most families love to hire people they already know, or who their current nanny recommends upon leaving. It’s important to put yourself out there by volunteering or maintaining contacts and references to increase your chances of being hired. A family would always much rather hire a nanny that was recommended to them than someone they found on the internet. How can you connect to others in the nanny industry? Talk to other nannies in your area, have play dates with nannies you meet at the park or on the soccer field. Join the International Nanny Association and look out for networking events in your area.

If you’ve been job searching for a while without any luck, take a step back and look at your applications from the point of view of a potential family. Ask yourself, based on what I’ve submitted, would I let this person in my home? Based on the previous points, review what you could be doing differently and create a game plan to showcase yourself in the best possible light and get back out there. Reach out to us at Los Angeles Nannies for resume building, advice and suggestions, we’d love to help you find the right family in any way that we can.

What do you feel nannies could do to increase their chances of getting hired? Let us know below!

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How To Write a Nanny Cover Letter

As a professional in the childcare industry you may wonder why it would be important to create a cover letter. A cover letter in the nanny industry is just as important as in any other enterprise. A properly tailored cover letter shows a family that you are passionate, interested and assists you in standing out amongst an ocean of resumes. Below we’ll show you how to write a nanny cover letter.

What to include

Cover letters are a great way to bring your resume to life for a family. Cover letters should be kept short and sweet. When writing your cover letter, it is helpful to break it down into three main groups: the name and nature of the position you are applying for, explain how the skills and jobs listed on your resume apply to the position, and finish with a call to action. In the end it should read something like this.

Get Specific

You must tailor your cover letter to each job you apply for. Emphasize specific experience from your resume that directly relates to the job description (link to resume blog). Not only does this help in filling in any gaps, but shows you took the time to read the description. The fact that you tailored your cover letter to the job specifically also shows your level of interest.

As a professional in the childcare industry you may wonder why it would be important to create a cover letter. A cover letter in the nanny industry is just as important as in any other enterprise. A properly tailored cover letter shows a family that you are passionate, interested and assists you in standing out amongst an ocean of resumes. 

Fill in the gaps

Think critically about the position and use past experience from your resume to explain how you could benefit the family in ways they never even dreamed of. If a job description for a family mentions that they have two children, describe the position you had previously where you were the lead teacher at a preschool, supervising a dozen toddlers at once, and how this experience has left you more than capable to handle two children. 

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Be Professional

Proof read! Make sure there aren’t any typos or grammatical errors in your nanny cover letter. If you are unsure, have a friend or family member edit your work. Typos make one look careless, and if you are applying for a job where you will be assisting a child with their homework, parents want to make sure you won’t be as indifferent with their child.

Be Positive

When summarizing your experience, it is important to highlight the joys of each position held. If you come across as negative or entitled when discussing your work, it will repel families. Families want to know that you enjoy being a nanny and that you left your previous positions on excellent terms.

Call to action

When concluding your cover letter, be sure to include a call to action. Say something like, “if you would like to know more about my experience, I am available by phone Monday – Friday from 8am until 5pm.” Make sure that your contact information is present so they can reach out to you should they decide you are a great fit.

A properly formatted, beautifully written cover letter can be the difference between blending in and standing out in a large pool of applicants. If you have any questions or concerns about crafting your cover letter, reach out to us! 

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How to become a private homeschool teacher

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If you’re a longterm Gossip Girl or Elite fan, you’ll understand why the role of private school teacher is a coveted and sought after position. For many nannies who have worked in high profile homes, taught after school classes, or have tutored or home educated, becoming a teacher in a private school is a logical, if not challenging, next step to take. In the current climate with schools largely operating at home, becoming an at-home private teacher may be the perfect route for a nanny with plenty of at-home work experience. So how can one become a private school teacher – at home? 

Understanding Private Schools

First, take a look at what makes a private school private. Public schools are funded by the government, with strict budgetary limitations based on each district’s tax allocations. A private school is privately funded, allowing teachers and students access to more resources not typically found in public schools. These resources range from athletic equipment, extracurriculars, classes in the arts and music, the latest technology, field trips, and classroom necessities. Nannies know exactly what it’s like to have their efforts funded directly by the family, however, families that homeschool often are eligible to receive money from the government for education. This homeschool fund is allocated for supplies, curriculum, time spent educating, and in some cases, for hiring a homeschooling teacher.
 

“The road to becoming a private school / homeschool teacher is long and winding, but the benefits are many. Increased salary, one-on-one learning, job security, and immense freedom in curriculum are just a few perks private homeschool teachers can expect from their jobs.!”

Responsibilities of a Private School Teacher

Private school teachers can expect more freedom in terms of funding and academic life, but they are also expected to participate in student life more heavily than a public school teacher would. Teachers can expect to be required to participate in extracurriculars such as coaching sports, providing mentorship and tutoring, sponsoring student clubs, liaising between the school and community, and participating in fundraising events. As parents are the ones funding the school and therefore each teacher’s salary, they will expect more opportunities for growth for their child and they will also expect more control over their education. This is especially true of teachers who provide at home education. Homeschooling teachers can expect to be directly collaborating with parents to create their child’s curriculum. Because the teacher will be in the child’s home working one-on-one, they will also be heavily involved in the development of the child’s social and emotional life, not just academic. Parents expect homeschooling teachers to be more than just educators. They are required to be mentors, role models, problem solvers, and life coaches. For at-home private teachers, life becomes a lesson. There are teaching opportunities in everything, and teachers can be much more creative in terms of creating lesson plans and field trips to better enrich the child’s learning. With extra funds, private homeschooling teachers can get extremely creative with the child’s academic program by taking trips, creating fun projects, or purchasing the latest educational technology. Homeschool teachers can also expect a more rewarding experience through creating a solid bond with the child.

Qualifications

Because a private school has more money and therefore more resources, the qualifying requirements of it’s teachers are more robust. The same is for private homeschooling educators. Most private schools will require at least a Bachelor’s Degree in Education, but having a Master’s will be preferred. Each parent will have their own education requirements expected of their homeschooling teachers, but continued education is still a great idea. Teachers will have to have a broad understanding of a multitude of subjects such as math, science, liberal arts, classroom management, special education, curriculum creation, moderation expertise, and child development. For private teachers, parents may follow specific childrearing philosophies, such as Montessori or Waldorf methods and will expect teachers to have completed certifications for their designated philosophy, or to do extensive reading on the subject prior to hire.
 

Courses

While there is no standardized testing requirement necessary to become a private school teacher, it could not hurt one’s standings to stand out in the applicant pool. Because many parents will have different expectations, its a great idea for homeschooling teachers to cover their bases and take as many courses as they can. Exams such as the CBEST, California Basic Educational Skills Test, the RICA, Reading Instruction Competence Assessment and the CSET, California Subject Exams Test are the most notable. Exams will vary from state to state, and each private school will have their own necessary requirements for teachers. For private teachers, reading up on homeschooling practices may be helpful as well.
 
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Internships

While getting hired by a private school right away may be difficult, it can be beneficial to ones cause to apply for an internship first. Many private schools offer internships to introduce prospective teachers to the private school industry, offering experience as well as the opportunity to make connections and relationships. Interns at private schools receive hands-on learning and are often available for mentorship by tenured private school teachers. It’s a great resume builder to stand out amongst the other applicants. It’s also a wonderful opportunity to make strong connections with individual students and family members who may be seeking an at-home private school teacher.

The road to becoming a private school / homeschool teacher is long and winding, but the benefits are many. Increased salary, one-on-one learning, job security, and immense freedom in curriculum are just a few perks private homeschool teachers can expect from their jobs. If you are a nanny looking to become an at-home educator, or a family looking to hire a private teacher for your child, reach out to us!

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Homeschooling / How to Homeschool Nanny Kids

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Many career nannies know that the time between drop off and pick up at school is sacred. The school hours are where nannies can do laundry, schedule appointments, sanitize toys, and gear up for an afternoon of homework help. We’ve seen how the recent change in the childcare industry has affected nannies with parents working from home, but homeschooling has had just as significant an impact. How can nannies navigating in this new zoom school territory succeed?

Here are some tips:

Brush up on your educator skills

Nannying while kids are homeschooling means that you will inevitably become teacher yourself. Remain patient, ask leading questions, and always help them come to their conclusions and assignments on their own. Doing tasks for them is not going to do anyone any favors. If they don’t respond to a certain explanation, try and show them another way that they will understand. The beauty of being a nanny and a teacher is that you know the kids and their interests much better than a teacher would be able to. Spark their creativity by using dinosaurs as metaphors for counting if they’re into paleontology right now. Let them practice letters by writing their favorite words. If you don’t know how to answer a certain question, there is a wonderful new invention called Google. Of course, be sly about when you look things up, kids learn by example and we can’t have them copping out via the convenience of search engines.

“We are in uncharted territory, and all of these big changes can be really difficult for children to digest. When it gets hard, remember that your focus is on being a caregiver. The child’s grades are not a reflection of you or your nannying abilities, so remain compassionate and patient, as confidence and care are the main foundations for a child’s academic success ”

Create a classroom environment

A similar issue with nannies working around work from home parents is spacial boundaries. Kids are used to having their entire homes be just that – their home. But now their sacred-kid-space has been turned into office, home and school all in one and this can become stressful and confusing for developing minds. Designate a specific classroom area where kids will do their learning. Kids need structure and boundaries in order to thrive, and knowing that the dining room or a specific section of the living room is now their “school section” of the home will help them focus their energy to that specific task. Spruce up the area maybe with posters or familiar classroom objects to help them feel more at ease. Take breaks and eat snacks away from the classroom area to better help them adjust and concentrate while they are working.
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Remain compassionate

We are in uncharted territory, and all of these big changes can be really difficult for children to digest. When it gets hard, remember that your focus is on being a caregiver. The child’s grades are not a reflection of you or your nannying abilities, so remain compassionate and patient, as confidence and care are the main foundations for a child’s academic success. It is also imperative that you have patience and compassion for yourself. You are a nanny and not necessarily an educator, so it may take some time for you to get into the swing of things. Remember your first day as a nanny, and how far you’ve come since then. Your educator skills will grow exponentially as well, which is a great thing to have on your nanny resume for future opportunities.
 
Nannying has always been fraught with rewarding challenges. If you are a nanny currently providing care to homeschooling children, we’d love to hear your stories of success and struggle alike. As always, reach out to us with any questions or concerns.
eas and tips on how to make every day equally fun and educational. There are a ton of awesome nanny blogs for creative solutions, as well as nannying groups you can join on social media.

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